Swedish Railway Models – Passenger Coaches

For many years, the passenger coaches in operation upon the FLMJ have been divided into four groups labelled “1940s,” “1960s,” “1980s” and “Pre-1940s.” Strictly speaking, the 1980s design was introduced in the late 1970s and what we considered to be the 1940s design can be traced back to the 1930s, or so it seemed. It had been difficult to distinguish between 1940s and previous designs, and we have felt for a long time that our website guide was probably incorrect, or at least misleading. Now, however, following some research with a limited knowledge of Swedish, we are able to improve the information that we can share. So, imitating the style that we have used for locomotives, rail cars & multiple units, here is a brand new guide to the passenger coaches for Swedish railways in H0-scale, focusing mainly on types at the FLMJ. First, though, here are some helpful notes.

  1. Passenger coaches are assumed to be mounted on bogies unless their ‘type’ includes the letter ‘V.’ Previously, passenger coaches were assumed to be 2-axle unless their ‘type’ included a small ‘o.’ As the transition was made, the type codes were changed; thus F2 became FV2 and Ao2 became A2.
  2. Some passenger coaches were rebuilt from other types, and we have not been entirely successful in identifying their origins; they are mentioned in the text where known.
  3. Sub types exist with types, and it is not possible to list them all, especially as these have changed over the years and coaches from one epoch might be the same ‘sub-type’ as coaches from another, and yet be very different in detail. See notes a bit farther below.
  4. An ‘open’ compartment is effectively two compartments knocked into one. Where the partition would have stood, there is a ‘coffee table’ and two loose chairs.
  5. Märklin coaches are supplied with wheel-sets that are designed to run on Märklin track and are therefore to a different profile and not insulated. Good model shops will exchange the wheel-sets for correct profile insulated alternatives at no cost.
  6. Because some of the model manufacturers produce track with tight radius curves, there is a risk of correct length coaches crashing into others on adjacent tracks at curves. They dealt with this problem by making the coaches to a compromised reduced length, usually 1:100 instead of the correct 1:87. This applies mainly to Fleischmann and Märklin models.

As for defining the year types – as a rule of thumb – please refer to these notes.

  • 1930s – Plain riveted body sides with about four or five upright (vertical) beading strips at below-window height. The doors are inset and the gangways were originally of the ‘concertina’ type.
  • 1940s – As 1930s but the plain body sides have three horizontal body-length beading strips at below-window height. The doors are inset and the gangways were originally of the ‘concertina’ type.
  • 1950s – Like 1940s, but the doors are flush and slightly rounded, in a similar manner to the later 1960s design.
  • 1960s – ‘Ribbed’ effect body sides with flush rounded doors.
  • 1970s – Similar to the 1940s design, but windows are lower; some examples have the ‘ribbed’ effect bodysides (like 1960s onwards).
  • 1980s – ‘Ribbed’ effect body sides with large bulky appearance, flat low-reaching doors.
  • 1990s – Like 1980s, except plain (non-ribbed) at window-height.
  • Where coaches don’t appear to fit any of the main categories, they are listed in a separate category farther down.

Type codes are summarised here, but are not universal (especially the suffixes)!
Prefix Letters
A = First Class
B = Second Class
BC = Couchette
D = Post
F = Baggage
R = Restaurant
S = Special
WL = Sleeper
Some Suffix Letters (but they keep changing)
B = Child coupe or facilities
C = For carrying containers
F = Minor modifications
G = Rebuilt
K = With DSB electric heating and ferry tie-down points
R = With MD bogies if not applicable to whole type
S = Kiosk or Pantry
T = Vacuum toilet
U = UIC cable fitted (for push-pull etc)
V = 2-axle Coach

Bogies

Before we get underway, here is a brief review of the most common bogie types in use under our models. Like the coaches themselves, these have developed over the years, and to a large extent the model manufacturers have faithfully reproduced the various designs. There are four principle types of bogie in use at the FLMJ, types 39, 42, MD and M84.

39

Several designs had of course existed before model 39, but as far as the FLMJ’s models are concerned, this is where the story picks up. Kockums took on the work of SJ’s mission to create a bogie suitable with Swedish conditions with respect to speed and track standard. Improving from type 35 they constructed a new Standard, type 39, which was then used for almost all coaches built in the forties and fifties. The last new-carriage type, the combined seat and baggage coach BFo4 (later BF1) in 1957 was given bogie type 39M, which differed somewhat from the original version.
The bogie had 3.0 m wheelbase, the weight was 5.8 tons and had four spring systems with leaf springs. When the 130 km/h was introduced as the highest speed for hauled trains model 39 was replaced by the newer MD bogies. In the sixties the brake block area was increased by substituting each block with two smaller blocks (twin block), this also allowing a higher speed. But eventually also those without twin block bogies were allowed to roll at 130 km/h.

42

For some heavier coaches type 39 was found to be too weak, and by replacing the leaf spring between the wheel-sets with two coil springs they brought about type 42. The redesign also allowed that the axle spacing could be reduced to 2.4 m. The bogie had three spring systems and weighed 6.3 tons. Most newly manufactured sleeping and dining coaches until mid-fifties had this bogie when delivered (e.g. ACo5, Ro3B and Ro3c). However, this bogie suffered from severe resonance phenomenon at certain speeds! In the fifties there was an experiment with a short leaf spring between the wheel-sets in the bogies under Do40 2940. Eventually the type was fitted with a vibration damper, which gave a much better ride. With the acquisition of MD bogies these were relegated to coaches with lower requirements for good running properties, e.g. older riveted (1930s) coaches and goods coaches Fo5 / F5 / F6 and F7.

MD

In 1954 two coaches were delivered from West Wagon in Cologne (BCo2, later AB8K) followed three years later by four more. The coaches were built by German construction standards but adapted to Swedish conditions. These coaches had no significant impact on passenger coach development in Sweden, but they rolled on a new bogie, Minden-Deutz, which SJ had not previously been in contact with.
The new bogies’ running characteristics proved to be very good and it was decided to replace most of the existing bogies in the thirties and forties coaches, and also to use it in the new sixties generation (all except Fo5). The Bogie purchase meant that almost all express train coaches (with the index letters r, later m) received MD as well as sleeping cars, though at first only allowed to go to 120 km/h. The freed bogies (types 39 and 42) substituted in turn the older Görlitz- and model 35- bogies which were scrapped. (Some riveted steel coaches still had model 07 before the change.) The look is different from all previous models. The bogie has no horn-block and instead has axle box control by horizontal leaf springs. The wheelbase was 2.5 m and weighed 5.7 tonnes. MD bogies are available in a large number of variants with only slight differences in appearance. The most common variant is the MD-12, where the figure denotes spring combination, depending on vehicle weight. There is another different variety, called MDL (L = leight i.e. light) and used for some of the rebuilt B3 coaches.
Today, MDS4 is a remodelled standard MD bogie equipped with four brake cylinders (one per brake disc).

M84 (ASEA)

ASEA developed a new bogie which certainly gave a more comfortable ride, but was also very expensive! The wheelbase was 2.6 m and weighed 6.2 tonnes. They were fitted under some 1980s coaches and the WL5 sleepers. The M84S, had disc brakes, was a so-called ‘soft bogie’ with radially controlled axles. Unfortunately, they are understood to be problematic in snowy conditions!

Today

The SJ default bogie is the MD, which is used under most coaches. It is available in several variations which are modifications of the original bogie. MD bogies with block brakes are MD, MDM, MDP, MD80 and MD8M. MD, MDM and MDP are mainly used under 1960s coaches; MD80 and MD8M are mainly under 1980s. MD bogies with disc brake are called MDS and are available in the following variants: MDS, MDS2, MDS3, MDS4, MDS4M and MD83S. (MDS2 is used under the AFM7 driver-trailer.)

First Class Coaches

A2

65 of these coaches were built 1963-1968; seating 40 passengers in two compartments and two saloons. A few of these were relabelled A2K as they were fitted with DSB electric heating and tie-down points for use on the ferries to Denmark. One, number 5155 was fitted with air conditioning.

  • Lima produced a pretty good 1:90 scale length model, very well detailed at the time, and in a small assortment of liveries. Later models were retooled with better glazing and NEM couplings, but they never received the built-in tail lamps (working nor non-working).
  • Märklin produces a 1:100 scale length model, very well detailed, complete with non-working tail lamps.
  • NMJ produces an excellent model in various versions from original brown Ao2 to more recent A2.

A5

24 of these coaches were built 1932-1945 (7) and 1945-1951 (17); seating 48 passengers in two saloons. Fifteen were labelled A5F and were completely smoke-free.

  • Märklin produced a 1:100 scale length model A5F for the Swedish market only, of the 1930 type.
  • UGJ produced a kit of the 1940 type, more recently produced by Lokstallet.

A7 (& A11)

56 of these coaches were built 1980-1987; seating 53 passengers in two saloons. They have the same body (and window spacing) as the B7, introduced around the same time.

  • Roco has produced a model since 1985, which has been available in an assortment of liveries, and also as the A11 version, but the only retooling since then has been the addition of the small circular window on the A11.

First & Second Class Coaches

AB2

35 of these coaches were built 1960-1962; seating 12 first class passengers in two compartments and 48 second class passengers in two compartments and two saloons.

  • NMJ produces an excellent model in various versions from original brown ABo2 to more recent AB2.

AB3

78 of these coaches were built 1961-1964; seating 20 first class passengers in two compartments and one ‘open’ compartment and 32 second class passengers in two saloons. 20 were relabelled AB3K as they were fitted with DSB electric heating and tie-down points for use on the ferries to Denmark. Also, a few were relabelled AB3T as they were fitted with a vacuum toilet.

  • Märklin produces a 1:100 scale length model, very well detailed, complete with non-working tail lamps.
  • NMJ produces an excellent model in various versions from original brown ABo3 to more recent AB3.

AB4

39 of these coaches were built 1930-1941 (32) and 1942-1948 (7); seating 12 first class passengers in two compartments and 64 second class passengers in eight compartments. Most of the earlier versions were relabelled AB4R as they were fitted with MD bogies, and they had been rebuilt from ABo11b (previously from BCo7b)!

  • Heljan produced a model of the earlier type, but as the BCo11b (2nd & 3rd class) (in original condition with concertina gangways). These were available with up to three different running numbers.
  • UGJ produced a limited edition kit of the later version for sale at the railway museum at Gävle.

AB7

84 of these coaches were built 1937-1940 (20) and 1942-1952 (64); seating 20 first class passengers in two compartments and one ‘open’ compartment and 46 second class passengers in three compartments and one saloon (the saloon with 3+1 seating). Many were relabelled AB7R as they were fitted with MD bogies.

  • UGJ produced a kit of the 1940 type, more recently produced by Lokstallet.
  • NMJ produces an early version of the AB7 (as BCo7) in 1940s style.

AB8K

6 of these coaches were built 1954-1957; seating 18 first class passengers in three compartments and 36 second class passengers in six compartments (all compartments seating 6). These coaches bore a striking resemblance to typical German (and Danish) coaches of the period and were intended for international traffic, being fitted of course, with DSB electric heating and tie-down points.

  • Roco produced a compromised scale model of this design, but with an incorrect number of compartments!

AB9

19 of these coaches were rebuilt 1994-1997 (originally built 1980-1989); seating 27 first class passengers in one saloon and 27 second class passengers in one saloon and one double-compartment!

  • Roco produced a model of this design as it deploys the standard A7/B7 body, but did not change the interior fittings to suit.

Second Class Coaches

B1

100 of these coaches were built 1960-1968; seating 62 passengers in two saloons. A few were relabelled B1K as they were fitted with DSB electric heating and tie-down points for use on the ferries to Denmark. Also, a smaller few were relabelled B1T as they were fitted with a vacuum toilet. Two (5099 & 5102) were fitted with EPB and allowed to operate at 160km/h, and one (5103) was fitted with air conditioning.

  • Märklin has produced a 1:100 scale length model in the original livery, and then retooled it with the later liveries.
  • NMJ produces an excellent model in various versions from original brown Bo1 to more recent B1.

B3S

2 of these coaches were rebuilt 1974 (originally built 1942 and 1944 as B8); seating 54 passengers in two saloons, and with a small serving kiosk at one end.

  • UGJ produced a very limited edition model of this type.

B5

115 of these coaches were built 1960-1967; seating between 60 and 68 passengers in five compartments and two saloons. The standard B5 seats 68 passengers. The B5B has two of the compartments made into children’s rooms with ‘changing’ facilities, thus 60 seats, and the B5G has one compartment converted for staff use.

  • Fleischmann produces a very poor representation of the Bo5b in 1:100 scale length.
  • Lima did NOT produce a B5, but simply relabelled their A2 as a B5 so that they could have a second class coach in their range!
  • Märklin produces a 1:100 scale length model, very well detailed, complete with non-working tail lamps.
  • NMJ produces an excellent model in various versions from original brown Bo5 to more recent B5.

B6

171 of these coaches were built 1940-1949; seating between 92 and 98 passengers in one open saloon. These were effectively loco-hauled commuter coaches and had double doors on each side at each end to speed up boarding and alighting. They did not have gangways, but did have fall-plates! The standard B6 seated 98 passengers, as did the B6F where one of the toilets was converted to a guard’s coupe! The B6G had 92 seats, but we have no further information (other than to record that B6G 4070 was rebuilt with only 80 seats)! 8 were rebuilt for use in the Göteborg area and relabelled B6GL / B6FGL, all with 92 seats.

  • På Sporet produces the B6 and B6G in an assortment of epochs.
  • C M Laser produced the B6G as an almost r-t-r model, as a limited edition.

B7 (& B9, B11)

171 of these coaches were built 1979-1990; seating 78 passengers in two saloons. They have the same body (and window spacing) as the A7, introduced around the same time. 38 of these coaches were rebuilt 1994-1997 as B9; seating 68 passengers in two saloons and one double-compartment. A few of these coaches were rebuilt with a seating layout similar to the UB2 (second-class coach in the X2000 sets) to be used in the X2000-relief trains!

  • Roco has produced the B7 for many years (see notes about the A7), which has been available in a small assortment of liveries, and also as the B9 and B11 versions, albeit with incorrect interior details.

B8 (& B15)

226 of these coaches were built 1930-1939 (98) and 1948-1952 (128); seating 78 passengers in four compartments (two at each end) and two saloons, each with 3+1 seating. All of the later coaches were actually labelled B8F. (The label “B8” is now used for B7 coaches that have been modified as “Family” coaches!) 147 of these coaches were rebuilt 1942-1952; seating between 68 and 78 passengers in an assortment of layouts! The standard B15 and B15R seats 74 passengers in four compartments (two at each end) and one saloon (with uni-directional 2+2 seating). The B15B seats 68 passengers in five compartments (two of which are joined to provide children’s facilities) and one saloon; and the B15F seats 78 passengers in five compartments and one saloon.

  • Heljan produced a model of the earlier type, but as the Co8d (3rd class) and Co8cs (with cafe compartment) (both in original condition with concertina gangways). These were available with up to three different running numbers.
  • Märklin produced a 1:100 scale length model for the Swedish market only, of the 1930 type.
  • UGJ produced a kit of the later types, actually as B8FR (with MD bogies) and B15F; more recently produced by Lokstallet.
  • NMJ produces an early version of the B8 (as Co8, Bo8, etc…) in 1940s style.

Co8a

The OKB East Coast Railway started in the 1920s with carriages built in Germany, and then more were built in Sweden to the original German design. They had ten composite (first and third class) carriages, two catering carriages, eight third-only carriages and three post/luggage carriages – and a lot of 2-axle carriages (they’re another story)! Some have been preserved; a few composites, one catering and one luggage carriage, but no Co8a. They were known as “Hechtvagnen” and the Co8a were later reclassified Bo8a and became one of the many B8 variants. Some of the composites survived in service into the 1980s as AB5 rebuilt with new rooves or AB9 in original condition.

  • Roco produced a model of a Co8a, number 2990 (which would have been OKB number Co2 88).

Second Class Couchette Coaches

BC1

13 of these coaches were rebuilt 1948-1951; seating 64 passengers in eight compartments, but sleeping only 48.

  • UGJ produced a kit of this type, more recently produced by Lokstallet.

BC4

In the series of 1980s cars that were delivered to SJ, 31 new couchette carriages were included. They have a traditional interior with six-bed coupes, and during the daytime the middle and upper beds can be folded away so that you get six seats instead. The body has almost the same layout as A7/B7 but has doors at only one end (the WL4/WL6 (qv) also has doors only at one end). At the other end there are toilets and wash-rooms.

  • HNoll, from 2019, produced the BC4 as a high-quality model.

Second Class and Goods Coaches

BF2

21 of these coaches were built 1943-1950; seating 32 passengers in four compartments, and with 25m² of luggage space.

  • UGJ produced a kit of this type, more recently produced by Lokstallet.

Post Coaches

DV30

58 of these 2-axle ‘vans’ were rebuilt 1984-1990 (originally built 1964-1966 as van type Gbs); and are now used within post trains.

  • Märklin produced a model of this design in the brown livery with yellow-blue-yellow stripes.
  • NMJ produces a model of this design in plain brown and with a small assortment of numbers. NMJ also produces a model of the earlier D30 which was based on an earlier wagon type.

Goods Coaches

F4

28 of these coaches were built 1943-1950; four variations giving three amounts of luggage space! The standard F4 and the F4K (the latter for running into Denmark) has 52m², the F4C (for containers) has 53m² and the F4F (with sorting racks) has 45m².

  • UGJ produced a kit of the F4F, more recently produced by Lokstallet.

F5 (F33) & F6K (F24K) (+ S17)

35 (F5) and 10 (F6) of these coaches were built 1961-1962 and 1961. They use the same body, but internally, the F6 has a side corridor, thus giving it only 24m² of luggage space compared with the F5’s 33m². As they have been rebuilt, they have been reclassified F33 (ex-F5) and F24K (ex-F6K). One of these coaches was rebuilt 1998 (originally built 1962 as F5 then F33) as S17, a train heating coach. This coach now has a diesel-electric generator and is hired out to one of the TOCs.

  • Lima used to produce a pretty good model of the F5 and then F6K. It has also been available as the F33 (with roller shutter doors for luggage instead of sliding) and as the S17 generator van.

FV1

285 of these 2-axle vans were built 1937-1949, with a luggage capacity of 31m².

  • Heljan produced a model of the FV1 in a number of guises, but labelled as F5 or F5-LÅ (not incorrectly).

Restaurant Coaches

R1

21 of these coaches were built 1960-1962; seating 46 passengers in saloons either side of the central cooking and serving area.

  • Märklin has produced a 1:100 scale length model in the original livery, and then retooled it with the later liveries.

RB1

In addition to the R1 restaurant carriages in the 1960s series, there were also 25 café carriages with a small second-class seating section. The carriages were delivered 1968-1969 and were type B1c (but after 1970, RB1). They were built by Kalmar Workshop, and SJ’s workshop in Örebro equipped and furnished them. Unlike R1, RB1 had no real kitchen but just a simple kitchenette that was at one end of the carriage. In the serving area there were 32 seats, in the second class area 16 seats. The RB1 were converted during the 1980s and 1990s into proper restaurant cars type R2*. Most went on to become R12 with Svenska Orientexpressen (The Swedish Orient Express), but most were later withdrawn from 2010. At the time of writing, five were believed to still be in service as R12 in the SSRT livery. (*’R2′ was used earlier for the ‘RBo2’ in the 1970s rebranding, but those carriages were very soon rebuilt and reclassified ‘R1’, thus allowing ‘R2’ to be available.)

  • NMJ released their model of the RB1 very shortly after announcing their intention to produce it in 2020. For NMJ to produce the almost identical R2/R12, they would need to change the size of one of the windows, but the potential earnings from such a model ought to make it worth the investment!

R3

15 of these coaches were built 1953-1954; seating 48 passengers in a saloon in one half of the coach, and with the cooking and serving area in the other half.

  • Lima produced a pretty good 1:90 scale length model, very well detailed at the time, but only in the original livery and the InterCity (brown with yellow chevrons) version. This model escaped the retooling with better glazing and NEM couplings due to that firm’s liquidation.

RB4

20 of these coaches were rebuilt 1984-1987 (originally built 1942-1952 as B3); seating 48 passengers in two saloons, and with a serving kiosk between them.

  • UGJ produced a very limited edition model of this type.

Special Coaches

Most special coaches have only one of each type, and were built for a specific purpose. In some cases, the same designation is used for different types!

S1 3607

Rebuilt 1945 from type A5 (later version), this is a conference coach with a variable number of seats, mostly around a central ‘board’ table. It also has a small bar.

  • UGJ produced a kit of this model, based around their A5 model, in two liveries.

S1 5248

Built 1981 into the same body as the new A7 type, this is also a conference coach with a central table and small bar.

  • Roco produced a model of this coach as part of their A7/B7 range.

S6

9 of these coaches were rebuilt 1994-1996 (originally built 1962-1968 as types A2 and AB3); for use as postal coaches, but not actually classified in the ‘DF’ type series!

  • Märklin produces a 1:100 scale length model, very well detailed, complete with non-working tail lamps.

S11

2 of these coaches were rebuilt 1991 (originally built 1962 as type AB3K); seating 15 passengers in the bistro area and 32 in the cinema! These are used exclusively in night trains.

  • Lima produced a 1:90 scale length model, based on their A2 design, in each of the two liveries that have been applied.

Sleeper Coaches

WL2

37 of these coaches were rebuilt 1946-1952; sleeping 33 passengers in eleven compartments.

  • Lima produced a pretty good 1:90 scale length model, very well detailed at the time, but only in the original livery. This model escaped the retooling with better glazing and NEM couplings due to that firm’s liquidation.

WL4

High standard compartments with own shower and toilet had proved to be popular in WL5 so SJ decided in the late 1980s to acquire more sleeping cars with this comfort; this time they ordered completely new ones with two beds per compartment. A total of 27 carriages were delivered in 1990-1992 from Kockums, because Kalmar had ceased carriage building.

  • HNoll, from 2019, produced the WL4 as a high-quality model.

WL6

SJ ordered 23 new sleeping cars in the early 1990s to replace older designs. They were given a traditional interior with three beds in each compartment but also a shower in the carriage ends. The intermediate bed can be folded up during the day so that the lower bed can be used as a sofa.

  • HNoll, from 2019, produced the WL6 as a high-quality model.

Other Coaches

Summary of 2-axle coaches

SJ Standard type

SJ’s first two-axle passenger carriages, manufactured in the late 1800s, were very short and plate-clad. Although bogie carriages began to be manufactured as early as the 1890s, two-axle carriages continued to be built for cost reasons. These were made slightly longer than the previously manufactured ones and were therefore provided with stretcher bars. The roof was made arched. In the 1910s, they changed from sheet metal to teak bodies. Type C3d (wood-clad) was made in 200 copies. Type C3d (sheet clad), C3e (wood-clad) and C3g (wood-clad) were produced in 75 copies each. They were used in major cities’ local traffic as well as in passenger trains in other parts of the country. The carriages were in traffic all the way into the 1950s. The C3e differed from the C3d with a small guard’s compartment, and the C3g had two sets of doors between the end platforms and the seating area and were intended for use in the colder north of the country. Other versions existed, including CD/CF (seating and luggage, post or other goods) and F (goods only).

  • Liliput produced a shorter wheel-base second class coach (B3g) and a baggage coach (F5), but their authenticity is doubtful, being based on more central European prototypes. Along with some bogie coaches, these have been out of production for a long time.
  • SMJ (Stockholm Model Railway club) has produced the C3d (steel or wood), C3e, and C3g as plastic kits, but with some etched parts.
  • Trix (& Märklin) produced a set of three (C3d/CD3/F5) with wooden bodies in a set with a type Sa steam loco. Märklin went on to release a solitary coach to support the set, but a 2-rail Trix version was never produced.

Ostkustbanan (OKB)

In 1926, OKB (Ostkustbanan / the East Coast Railway) purchased 15 steel carriages from the German company Gotha. Ten of these were intended for local trains (seven of type C3 and three of type CD with postal coupé). The remaining five carriages, type CF, were intended for local freight trains. They had C3 bodies but decor and luggage areas of the same type as SJ’s type CF4. For carriage of the sick, four carriages with the designation C3s were purchased from Kockums in 1927. During the years 1929-1931, another five C3 carriages were purchased from ASJ in Linköping. In 1933, OKB was nationalised, with all carriages taken over by SJ. Some were in traffic all the way into the 1960s.

  • SMJ (Stockholm Model Railway club) has produced the C3, C3s, CD and CF as plastic kits, ready painted in OKB green livery, but with some etched parts. They have also been available unpainted (with SJ transfers) for later versions.

Articulated SJ

In order to give SJ’s 2-axle C3 carriages a quieter time on the track, eight were joined in the 1930s to four CC3d. The “new” carriages consisted of pairs of interconnected C3 carriages, which on the joint rested on a common so-called “Jacobs bogie” (articulated). These four two-carriage units were later changed to two four-car units, later called type CC4. In the same year two more were built as CC4 and 11 CC2. In the years 1934–39 another 34 were built as CC2 based on type C3d and C3e. The 45 meter long CC4 carriages became overly unwieldy over time. In 1939 they were therefore divided into eight CC2. After all the new and rebuilding there were then 53 copies of the CC2 carriages. They were withdrawn during the first years of the 1960s.

  • SMJ (Stockholm Model Railway club) has produced the CC2 as a plastic kit, but with some etched parts.

NSB Coaches

Non-RTR Coaches

Interesting kit models of much older designs

We present here some information about early epoch carriages. These are not available as ready-to-run models, but as kits. They are included here with pictures from the kit manufacturers’ websites to illustrate the history of Swedish passenger carriages – but obviously focussing on those available as models – even if only as kits!
Michael Thörning from Skultorps Vagn & LokVerkstad (SV&LV) has taken over the Perlmodell range, and presently there are no links to these models.

Ao2

An interconnection agreement with the Prussian State Railways KPEV forced SJ to keep special carriages in the continental trains. Adapted to the German standard and to the train ferries, these so-called Sassnitz carriages came to deviate from normal SJ standards. The Ao2 was delivered in 1909 in 18 copies and was broadly similar to the Prussian Mitropa wagon type WL4ü Pr-01.

Bo3

SJ received 38 carriages type Bo3 in the years 1902-1906. 2nd class cars were painted dark green at this time if they had beds, which most Bo3 carriages did, but from 1906 they were painted dark blue in order to also be used as 1st class cars. Decorated with yellow texts and linings, these were elegant and for their time, comfortable carriages. All Bo3 carriages were rebuilt in the 1920s.

Bo4 / Bo14 / Co4b

In 1921–1922, ten Bo3 carriages were rebuilt into 3rd class, thus Co11, later Co4b and finally in 1956 they became Bo14b. The remaining 28 Bo3 carriages were rebuilt in 1923–1932 and modernised 2nd class carriages as Bo4, but later reclassified to 3rd grade Co4b, and from 1956 Bo14b. Some carriages got a new body and became Bo10b; some others were furnished to 1st class and became Ao14a.

BCo1

These elegant carriages were painted externally with the second-class section in dark green and the third-class section dark brown. From 1906 the green part was painted in ultramarine with the motivation that it could be used as the first class car. The class of the second class section was therefore painted on a loose reversible plate. The marking was done with beautifully painted yellow text with yellow-brown shading and yellow framing of the sheet metal.

The carriages were rebuilt and modernised in traffic into the 1970s. During all these years, a lot of deviations and occasional modifications had taken place. One example is BCo1 no. 1660 from 1907, which in 1925 received the innermost second-class coupe changed to a coupe with side doors and designation BCo10. It was restored in 1937 to BCo5a. One of the carriages was taken away in the 1960s and is now in a restored condition preserved at the Railway Museum in Gävle.

BCo5 / ABo15 1030

ABo15 1030 was originally a BCo3 which was later relabelled BCo5. In the 50s, the carriage came with a completely new body with windows, as well as new high-ceilinged roof. In the 1950s, SJ made many copies of this type, which means that the body is a good representative for SJ wooden carriages during the 50s and 60s.

BCo7 / ABo7a

SJ received 25 BCo1 carriages model 1893 during the years 1893–1895. A further series of 38 BCo1 carriages model 1897 was delivered in 1897–1900. Another series comprised 16 carriages model 1901 which were delivered in the years 1901-1907. These series had mutually minor deviations, for example the last series had two-part wider windows in the second-class section.

In the years 1925–1932, the majority of carriages were changed to BCo3 or BCo5, where the sleeping interior of the second-class department was removed; the carriages that became BCo5 had one of the second-class compartments changed to third-class. From 1926 to 1928, with some exceptions, all BC carriages were rebuilt with covered platforms. From 1927, they were rebuilt with electric lighting, compressed air brake was installed and in 1928 the bogies began to be replaced by model 07. From 1932 the lanterns were removed and in 1935 the vacuum brake was removed. Window frames began to change in 1938 and on some carriages completely new windows were installed from 1948, but only when needed.

Some carriages received a new body in 1948–1950 with a fully arched roof without lantern, some carriages became third-class only, and in connection with the class reform in 1956, the other BCo carriages received ABo-designation.
They were in traffic up to the 1960s.

Co1

The Co1 carriages were manufactured in 42 copies for SJ and 12 for different private railways during the years 1896–1900. The third-class carriages with SJ were elegantly painted in brown with yellow markings and decorative lines. Already in the 1920s, all Co1 carriages were rebuilt and modernised.

Co1 / Bo11

Originally Co1 from 1896, which in 1926-1929 was subject to extensive modernisation. Some thirty of the carriages were adapted for passenger traffic on longer distances. From 1956 they became Bo11. The remaining Co1 carriages became Co9.

Co4a (rebuilt from ABo1)

In 1936, 21 carriages were built around the third class seat cars Co4a and at the same time the bogies were changed to -07. The interior was steel tube sofas and 1-4 seating with 4 partitions, one with door and two toilets. Co4a / Bo14a was abolished and scrapped in the early 1960s.

Co4d (ex-Ao1a)

1945-1951 4 carriages type Ao1a were converted to 2 class Co4d. The refurbishment was extensive and got a new body that largely corresponded to the modern steel carriages – but with wooden panels!

Co5

In total, 48 carriages type Co5 were built between 1901-1911, with Co4 as the prototype. Co5 received among other things, another window division with larger windows.

Co8a (also DJ Co19)

Co8a was the last type of passenger carriage that was built in big numbers before the steel carriages completely took over from about 1930. The carriages were built by several different workshops from 1917-1929 in 78 copies. They were also modelled for the later delivered steel carriages type Co8. They have different types of footsteps with 2 or 3 steps.

Co8cr (formerly BJ RCo)

BJ rebuilt a pair of BCo3 into combined seats and restaurant cars. SJ took over the carriages and let them roll roughly unchanged until the 1960s.

Co9 / Bo9a

To cover the rapidly increasing demand for new carriages in the 1920s, 23 Co1 carriages were modernised along with two CDo2 and four UGJ carriages. They became Bo9a in 1956.

Co13

Local train carriage, which often ran with Co6 and F5, pulled by H or D locomotive. Later, the carriages were used in passenger trains on many different sections.

CFo4 / CFo5

The model CFo1 was delivered in the years 1900-1907 in 24 copies, of which the first two were narrower and intended for continental traffic. Starting in 1925, the carriages were modernised in different ways. 15 were provided with a built-in gable platform in the passenger end, these became CFo4. Carriages with this appearance existed until 1933 and had for the entire period gas lighting and compressed air brake. Most had the vacuum brake retained, but some were replaced with a through vacuum line when the compressed air brake was installed.

In 1927, another six carriages were rebuilt in a similar way, but with both gable platforms built-in. In addition, in 1927 the luggage platform was built-in on two of the first-mentioned CFo4 carriages. These eight carriages, which were now CFo5, also got the luggage door exchanged for an external sliding door and a passage corridor in the luggage compartment.

In 1928–1929, the remaining three CFo1 carriages were rebuilt in the same way as the aforementioned CFo5, but then the bogies were replaced with stronger bogies, and at the same time, the bogies were replaced on all CFo5 carriages. The six CFo4 carriages were also changed during the years 1928–1929 to this design. Between 1931 and 1933, the last seven CFo4 carriages were converted to CFo5.

Finally, at least three carriages in the 1940s and 1950s got the windows replaced by almost rectangular full glass windows. The CFo5 was in traffic up to the 1960s. The carriages ended their days as BFo15-L after the 1956 rebrand from CFo5.

DFo1

21 DFo1 mail and luggage carriages were delivered to SJ in 1891–1902. In 1900, a new colour scheme was introduced for mail carriages, with the former yellow-black painting being replaced with 3rd grade brown. The beautiful subtitles and lines were in both cases yellow, except on the yellow fields where it was blue. The carriages were modernised in the 1920s.

DFo3 / DFo48

To replace DFo1, DFo3 was built, but DFo1 continued to roll so there were only four built (2633-26). They were delivered from SJ Huvudverkstad in Örebro in 1922, with red painted pine body. Two of them were used in 1927 for mail in the entire vehicle in different trains on the Stockholm – Gothenburg route. In 1927-29 they were rebuilt with electric heating and so that the service compartment in the luggage area was removed and the wagon became Do4 later Do52. Two carriages went up the same stretch in 1929. The carriages were, in appearance, quite unchanged until the end. The carriages were delivered with vacuum pipe and ‘Knorrbroms’ (brakes). The vacuum pipes were taken out in 1932-33. The oil gas lighting was replaced with generator lighting in 1933-36. The last major revisions made in 1950s, and the carriages were withdrawn in 1962-65; the last was scrapped in 1971.

DFo7

3 DFo7 carriages were built by Svenska Maskinverken in Södertälje in 1933. The carriages were used between Oslo and Malmö; but during the war however, between Stockholm and Gothenburg; and then went to Oslo to Copenhagen. The carriages were never rebuilt, and were scrapped in 1969.

DFo29 / Do48

DFo1 (from the years 1891-1902) was modernised in the 1920s and was provided with compressed air brake, more modern bogies and electric lighting. However, the open platforms were retained. They became DFo29. Some carriages were changed in the 1940s to mail carriages and became Do48.

Ro1

SJ’s ABo3 restaurant cars were rebuilt early, with built-in platforms and better kitchen facilities. The ABo3 carriages were in many cases different from each other, and through modifications all carriages remained different. The carriages were delivered in 1892 and lacked storage space, but got it as early as 1903. In 1909, they got a speed-driven wind fan. Already in 1912-13 the next rebuilding came, which meant that the carriages got built-in platforms and corridor past the kitchen section. In 1916, the glass shutters came in the dining windows, and in 1921 roof hatches for ventilation over the stove. Electric heating and sockets were installed in the early 30s. At the same time, the gas lighting was removed and replaced with generator / battery. In the mid-50s, the carriages became exhibition vans, and were withdrawn during the 60s.

Ro2A

These 2 restaurant cars were built by Kockums in 1929, and thus became the first steel restaurant carriages in Sweden. They were ABo3a. In 1959, they were changed to Ro2, later Ro2a. During the 1960s, the carriages had a larger window on the kitchen side. The carriages were withdrawn in 1970, but 2769 was transferred to TGOJ as a conference car S3 1001.

SJ C3

SJ’s first two-axle passenger carriages, manufactured in the late 19th century, were very short, plate-covered and fitted with lanterns. Although bogies began to be manufactured in the 1890s, they continued to build two-axle carriages for cost reasons. These were made slightly longer than the ones previously manufactured and were therefore provided with support rails. The ceilings were made arched and without the lantern. In the 1910s, they moved from sheet metal to teak panelling. Type C3c (with lantern intake) and a few C3d (with a smooth roof) were covered in metal. Later the C3d was teak panelled, as well as type C3e and C3g. C3d (wood-clad) was made in 200 copies. C3d (sheet covered), C3e and C3g were each manufactured in 75 copies. They were used in the urban cities’ local traffic and in passenger trains in other parts of the country. The carriages were in traffic right into the 1950s.

CC2 med Jakobsboggi (articulated set)

To give the 2-axle C3 carriages a quieter ride on the track, eight were rebuilt in the 1930s for four CC3d. The “new” carriages consisted of pairs of interconnected C3 carriages, which on the joint rested on a common so-called “Jacobs bogie”. These four two-carriages were later changed to two four-wheeled “aggregate” – later called CC4. In the same year, more were built. Between 1934 and 39, another 34 were built. The CC2 was based on a type C3d / C3e. The 45-meter long CC4 carriages eventually became too cumbersome. In 1939 they were therefore divided into eight CC2. After all new and redevelopments, there were then 53 copies of the CC2 carriage pairs. At the great re-publication in 1956, the CC2 wagons became BB2, but were dropped during the first years of the 1960s.

More details on SMJ website

SJ CF4 Lokaltågsvagn

Originally a little C3a, which was rebuilt in 1944–1946 and was provided with a luggage department. A large number of carriages, more or less equal to the SJ type, were added when C3a carriages built for different individual railways came to SJ and were rebuilt in a similar way.

SJ C3a Lokaltågsvagn

Around the year 1900 some seventy wagons of this type were built. SJ bought 40 pieces, of which 10 had vacuum brake, the other only screw brake and through vacuum line. In the 1920s, all carriages got compressed air brakes and in the 1940s all were converted to ambulance or luggage wagons type CF4.

SJ C3a Lokaltågsvagn

Modernised design of the C3a body from 1901. Equipped with compressed air brake and electric heating.

SJ/HNJ C3c Lokaltågsvagn

The German D3i carriages, which came to Sweden after World War I were rebuilt in all sorts of ways. Upon modernisation, HNJ, on its C3 carriages, removed the middle axle and replaced it with one tension leg. The carriage body was not replaced but the lanterns were. Other variants of refurbishment are the BJ or the BAJ versions. In this condition, they were taken over by SJ where they received designation C3c. Long after the takeover, they were still in traffic with HNJ-marking.

TGOJ C4 Lokaltågsvagn

TGOJ bought eight C4 wagons from AB Södertelge Workshop in 1908. They were manufactured entirely in accordance with the SJ type. From 1925 to 1936, they were quite radically rebuilt and were given teak panels and new windows. With a new carriage body covered with a teak panel, the C4 carriage became an elegant one.

TGOJ F3 Resgodsvagn

TGOJ was one of many private railways that in 1918 participated and bought three-axle D3i wagons from Germany, see C3c. Four carriages were acquired which were fairly immediately rebuilt into luggage carriages. In 1942 their final appearance was given a completely new body and up to 1964 further modernisations were made.

SJ/BAJ C3c Lokaltågsvagn

This is a variant of the rebuilding of the German D3i carriages, which BAJ did in the same way as BJ or the HNJ. The most visible difference is that the BAJ carriage got sheet-covered carriage body.

SJ/BJ C3c Lokaltågsvagn

The German D3i carriages. They came to Sweden after the First World War were rebuilt in all kinds of ways. BJ took away the middle axle and replaced it with a tensioning rod. The rusting body was replaced by a new pine panelled wooden body. In this condition, the carriages were taken over by SJ where they received designation C3c.

SJ C4 Lokaltågsvagn

The C4 carriages from 1904–1908 were early modernised in 1910, introduced gas lights, in the 20’s compressed air brake and in the 30’s electric heat. Between 1946 and 1950, twenty C4 carriages were lent to Dutch State Railways, NS. These went in traffic completely unchanged and with SJ marking, but the class figures were removed.

C3 (BJ/GDJ/HNJ/MYJ Lokaltågsvagn

Preußiska statsbanar, KPEV, received in 1918 the delivery of a very large number of 3-axle 4e class carriages type D3i “Traglastwagen”, later DRG C3itr, mainly intended for the armed forces’ troop transports and ambulance trains. In connection with the end of the war, many of these carriages were sold all over Europe. Sixty-two came from 1920 to 1922 to a variety of Swedish private railways that decorated and modernised them in various ways.

SJ C4 Lokaltågsvagn

From 1904 to 1908, 140 C4 carriages were delivered to SJ and at least 40 to different private railways. The construction of the carriages was fairly simple, they were intended for traffic mainly during the summer period. The C4 carriages were modernised at an early stage. The 1910 gas lights were introduced, in the 20’s compressed air brake and in the 30’s electric heat.

SJ EC3
The carriage was part of a series of extra short types from Kockums to a large number of railways in Skåne. One, YEJ 26, however, was modernised with new windows, high ceilings and extended shoulder rails.