Swedish Railway Models – Goods Wagons

When we updated our review of passenger coaches available in H0-scale for the Swedish scene, we trembled at the thought of doing the same for goods wagons! Wagons are much more “international” than coaches, and many wagons from other countries can be seen operating in Sweden. For this new review, we are concentrating on Swedish wagons mainly, but a few honourable mentions might creep in, later! So, imitating the style that we have used for our newer reviews, here is a brand new guide to the goods wagons for Swedish railways in H0-scale, focusing mainly on types at the FLMJ.

To research this article, we had to dig deeply into the UIC numbering of goods wagons to understand more about the types.
Click here for more information on UIC goods wagon numbering.

First, though, here are some helpful notes.

  • Many goods wagons have been modified over the years, given new type designations, and generally knocked about to an extent where it is impossible to identify them all. We will generalise where this is the case! Similarly, sub types exist with types, and again, it is not possible to list them all. Some wagons have also been completely changed; the Iron Ore wagons being a prime example – whether they changed from “Faoo” to “Uad” or the other way around, we’re not entirely sure! We have been fortunate to consult a now rather dated copy of “SJ Godsvagnar” an official folder, (SJF 636.1). As usual for this sort of document, it does not shew a date, but it does bear the old SJ “Meat-stamp” logo! This has needed translating and we apologise for any misunderstandings that appear as a result. Nevertheless, we have been fortunate to receive the help of Marianne, Göran and Dennis, whom have answered a plea for translations of some of the very obscure (in some cases) words and phrases; our sincere thanks to them.
  • Märklin wagons are supplied with wheel-sets that are designed to run on Märklin track and are therefore to a different profile and not insulated. Good model shops will exchange the wheel-sets for correct profile insulated alternatives at no cost. Some manufacturers are very imaginative with their liveries, and a few (Märklin especially) have produced wagons in liveries that are not at all authentic. We do not intend to include these in this review, but it is possible that through being misinformed, some are incorrectly assumed to be correct.

Type codes are summarised here, but are not universal:

E = Standard type open box wagon, usually for ore, scrap, etc
F = Special type open box wagon, usually for large goods, (wood) chippings, charcoal, etc
G = Standard type closed goods van with sliding door
H = Special type closed goods van with opening sides so that half of the wagon can be open
I = Insulated closed goods van (“I” has also been used for open mineral wagons)
K = Standard type flat wagon with 2 axles
L = Special type flat wagon with 2 axles, usually for containers, etc
M = Older style Ore wagons
O = Combined flat and open box wagon
R = Standard type flat wagon with bogies
S = Special type flat wagon with bogies, usually for heavy or bulky goods, lorry trailers, containers, timber, transformers, etc
T = Wagon with opening roof
U = Other special type wagons for goods with special requirements (e.g.; Iron Ore hoppers which discharge, etc)
Z = Wagons for liquids or gases (Tank wagons)
Also to be noted:
Q = Wagons in Infrastructure Department use
Q12 = old designation for SWB Tank wagons (probably now under the “Z” category!) (Note: a German website that includes a little information about Swedish wagons, shews Q… numbers from 1 to 52 (not complete) and describes the Q12 as “2achsiger Tankwagen” (2-axle tank-wagon).)

Each type also has sub-letters, but these are different for each type, so they are shewn with the types (where known)! As a rule-of-thumb, sub-letters in the ‘a’-‘s’ series are international, and from ‘t’-‘z’ are variable nationally. Also note that sub letters are not the same for each wagon type; see sub-letter ‘a’ for types ‘O,’ ‘S’ & ‘T,’ for example!

However, where sub-letter ‘s’ appears to be universal for wagons permitted at 100km/h, the sub-letter ‘ss’ has appeared recently for 120km/h; but we had to reach a point at where to stop and publish – and we will update later!

Type E

a = 4 wheel-sets
o = not end tipping
s = permitted in trains up to 100km/h

Type “Eaos” are bogie open wagons. An almost identical wagon is type “Fas,” and these operate into Belgium. Similar in appearance, is the “E”/”El;” which had three axles!

  • Klein Modellbahn has made the “Fas;” see next sub-section for details.
  • Lima used to make the “Eaos” wagon in SJ brown.

Type F

a = 4 wheel-sets
b = volume greater than 45m³
oo = loose gravity discharge hopper. Underside of floor <70 cm above top of rails. Lifting gear cannot be used
u = large profile, not to leave Sweden
s = permitted in trains up to 100km/h
x = large profile

Types “Faoo” and “Faoo-x” are apparently the new (or old) type codes for the “Uad” and “Uadp” wagons [qv].

Type “Fb-u” is a wood chippings van with open roof (but with curved framework to support a tarpaulin) and low level top-hinged side doors (for easy discharge).

  • Klein Modellbahn has made the “Fas” in a turquoise colour, also marked with SNCB – at least two other versions of this wagon have been produced by Borlänge railway club.
  • Lima used to make the “Fb-u” wagon with opening lower doors. This has now become available in the Hornby/Rivarossi “international” range as a set of three, and now has NEM couplings.

Type G

b = 12m length or more and 70m³ loading area
h = for early vegetables
l = less than 8 ventilation openings
o = with loading length under 12m and more than 70m³ loading area
r = with steam heating pipes
s = OK at 100 km/h
u = through-cabling for 1500v and 16 2/3 Hz

400 type “Grh” were delivered to SJ from 1927, and were in use until the end of the 1970s. From 1941, 500 “G” (or “Gu”) closed wagons were delivered to SJ. A further 100 were made for Swedish Private lines. Altogether 3471 goods wagons derived from type “G” were produced. Also, the SJ D30 Post wagon with doors in both ends (for post transport in passenger trains) is based on the “G” van.

Type “Gbl” is a 6,4m wheelbase van (see model notes).
Type “Gbls” is a 8m wheelbase van (see model notes).
Type “Gbs” is a 6,4m wheelbase van (see model notes).
Type “Gls-u” is a 5,5m wheelbase van (see model notes).
Type “Gs” is a 4,5m wheelbase van (see model notes).
Type “Gsu” is a 4,5m wheelbase van (see model notes).

For more info on ‘G-vans’, see our special feature.

  • Liliput used to make the “Gls-u,” but there is a possibility that this model is actually built on a non-Swedish wagon, and is too short – we’ll update this file whenever we find out!
  • Lima used to make the “Gbs” originally with steps and platform at one end, and later retooled without the steps and platform (but with NEM couplings). This has now become available in the Hornby/Rivarossi “international” range as a type “Ge” in a set of three; but strangely, the three wagons are numbered from different epochs!
  • NMJ has recently produced several versions of wagons such as the “G,” “Gbl,” “Gbls,” “Gbls-u,” “Gbs,” “Giu,” “Gre,” “Grf” (Refrigerated version), “Grh,” “Gu” and “D30.” Authentically, there are different wheel-bases, 6,4m & 8m, and all sorts of subtle differences with the van bodies!
  • Piko has produced the “Gs” and “Gsu” as limited editions for the Swedish market; but there is a possibility that these models are actually built on non-Swedish wagons, and are too short – we’ll update this file whenever we find out!
  • Roco has produced the “Gbl” with two running numbers, but we understand that these were a limited edition.

Type H

a = 4 wheel-sets
b = 12-14m length, 70m³ volume, may be less for ferry boat wagons (see ‘f’ next)
bb = 2-axle wagon with separate axles and loading length of 14m or more OR bogie wagon with loading length of 22m or more
f = suitable for ferries to Great Britain
i = opening side walls (sliding walls)
kk = maximum load on class C route: variable between 20t & 25t
ll = with lockable partitions (from 1 May 1994)
n = maximum load on class C route: 28t
o = loading length under 12m and more than 70m³ loading area
rr = steam heating pipes and equipment
s = OK at 100 km/h
t = with dividing (partitioning) walls
u = large profile, not to leave Sweden
v = large volume

There are several variants of the type “H…” van, and some of them have seemingly long “type codes.”

Types “Habbillns” and “Habins” are long vans on bogies.
Types “Hbbikks,” “Hbbins,” “Hbikks,” “Hbins” and “Hbis” are all shorter vans on 2 axles.

  • Hobby Trade has recently produced “Hbis” wagons in various guises; “Hbins,” “Hbillns,” “Hbis” (of course) and even “Hirrs” which is effectively two “Hbis” wagons semi-permanently coupled together. Apart from a major faux-pas with the placement of the NEM couplings at one end, these are very nice wagons.
  • Märklin has produced “Habins” wagons in “Nordwaggon” livery.
  • Roco has produced various wagons of most types. There are also a number of wagons of these types in authentic Swedish liveries, but with German (or other) Railway numbers.
  • (Note: Fleischmann’s “Hbis” wagons in “IKEA” and “SKF” liveries, are labelled for the German railways, and are not, so we’ve been told, authentic!)

Type I

b = loading area 22-27m²
bb = loading area of 27m² or more
c = meat hooks
l = insulated wagon without ice chests
o = ice chests under 3.5m³
p = no slatted floor
s = OK at 100 km/h
v = large volume
w = rebuilt (from) “Ibps”

The letter “I” has lent itself to open wagons, and to insulated versions of the “G” vans.

Type “Ibblps” is an insulated van, based on the “G” body and usually painted white.
Type “Ibcos” is a shorter insulated van and built to a visibly different profile.

  • Hobby Trade has produced the “Ibcos” van in a few versions (“Ibcos” with UIC number, “H” with pre-UIC number). Apart from a major faux-pas with the placement of the NEM couplings at both ends, these are very nice wagons. More recently, they have produced a much better “Icps” van (“He” if pre-UIC) in a few versions, fully NEM-Compliant.
  • Lima produced the “Ibblps” for a number of years. Additionally, as a limited edition, they produced it in three versions in ‘advertising’ liveries, thus; “After-Eight,” “Findus” and “Kit-Kat.”
  • NMJ produces the “Ibblps” and very similar versions with an assortment of numbers and markings.

Types “Ir,” “Is(u),” “Iss” and “Isu” are short wheelbase open goods wagons (‘box wagons’ in English terms), and probably belong to an earlier epoch than the vans.

  • Märklin has produced a set of five wagons of the open type, loaded with coal; but there is a possibility that these models are actually built on non-Swedish wagons, and are too short – we’ll update this file whenever we find out!
  • Piko has produced various versions of the open wagon as limited editions for the Swedish market; but again, there is a possibility that these models are actually built on non-Swedish wagons, and are too short – we’ll update this file whenever we find out!

Type K

b = non-bogie wagon with long stakes
i = fixed front wall, movable top cover
p = no sides
s = OK at 100 km/h

The “Kbis” is a short flat wagon with tarpaulin cover, and used for carrying steel (see model notes)!
The “Kbps” is a flat wagon with stakes (similar to the type “O”).

  • CM Laser produced three “Kbis” wagons in Swedish/Italian “ProRail” liveries, as very limited editions.
  • NMJ has produced the “Kbps” wagon in an assortment of numbers, UIC and older.
  • Rivarossi (Hornby) has produced the “Kbis” wagon in “Nordwaggon” livery.

Type L

a = 3 wheel-sets
g = for container transport
j = cushioning device to absorb bumps
l = no stakes
m = loading length: variable between 9m & 12m
mm = loading length: < 9m
n = maximum load on class C route: 30t (40t if ‘La’ ad 60t if ‘Laa’)
s = OK at 100 km/h
w = ?? (the term “med glidande lastram” needs translating, please!)

These are 2-axle container wagons. There is not much difference between sub-types, at least from the modellers’ point of view.

  • Lima used to produce the “Lgjs” with various loads; with “Chiquita,” “Slotts Senap” and “Svelast” the better known among them.
  • Märklin has produced the “Lgjns” and “Lgjns-w” in an assortment of liveries, mostly in set packs.
  • NMJ has produced a few “Lgjs” and similar wagons in an assortment of liveries.
  • UGJ has produced the “Lgjns” and “Lgjs” with an assortment of container liveries. At least one was marketed by a third party!

Type M

a = 3 wheel-sets
s = OK at 100 km/h

These are 3-axle iron ore wagons with stakes. They did not renumber into UIC series, and the type designation may have been changed (from ‘M’) if they had! (In original condition they were previously M2.)

  • NMJ produces a set of four “Mas” wagons in original condition (on the Roco chassis) and assortment of number sets and epochs.
  • Roco produces a set of four “Mas” wagons in rebuilt condition and assortment of number sets and epochs.

Type O

a = 3 wheel-sets
kk = maximum load on class C route: variable between 20t & 25t
m = loading length: variable between 9m & 12m
s = OK at 100 km/h

These are 2-axle flat wagons with stakes and low sides; the sides can usually be folded flat or removed.

  • Hobby Trade has produced the “Om” wagon in an assortment of numbers, UIC and older.
  • Lima used to produce the “Om” wagon without any markings. The stakes could be removed (and often lost) and the sides could be folded down, but they didn’t lay very flat, and were prone to falling down when up!
  • Märklin / Trix has produced the “Oms” wagon as a set of three.
  • NMJ has produced the “Os” wagon in an assortment of numbers, UIC and older.

Type R

p = no end wall
s = OK at 100 km/h

  • NMJ produces the “Rps” wagon as a version which ran in Norway, but has been brought to Sweden for use by ‘Tågab’ for carrying timber.

Type S

a = 6 wheel-sets
d = for transportation of motor vehicles on one level
g = for containers up to 60 feet
h = for sheet metal coils laid horizontally
i = fixed front wall, movable top cover
m = loading length: variable between 15m & 18m
mm = loading length: < 15m
n = maximum load on class C route: 75t
s = OK at 100 km/h

Types “Sdgmns” and “Sdgms” are bogie-flat wagons for containers and lorry trailers.
Type “Shimmns” is a telescopic steel carrier; short in length, but on bogies due to the weight carried.

  • NMJ produces the “Sgs” wagon as a version which ran in Norway, but has been brought to Sweden for use by ‘3T’ for carrying timber (not containers as the ‘g’ suggests).
  • Roco produces all sorts of “Sdgmns,” “Sdgms” and “Shimmns” wagons. There are also a number of wagons of these types in authentic Swedish liveries, but with German (or other) Railway numbers.

Type T

a = 4 wheel-sets
b = wagon with separate axles and length over 12 m OR bogie wagon with loading length of 18 m or more
i = opening side walls (sliding walls)
kk = maximum load on class C route: variable between 20t & 25t (40-50t if ‘Ta’, 50-60t if ‘Taa’)
m = loading length: < 9m or < 15m if ‘Ta(a)’
s = OK at 100 km/h

The “Tbis” is a 2-axle van, vaguely similar to the type “H,” but also with an opening roof.

  • Roco produces the “Tbis” in an assortment of liveries.

Type U

a = 4 wheel-sets
aa = 6 wheel-sets
c = compressed air or air blast discharging system
d = loose gravity discharge hopper, fast unloading at both sides at same time
h = ?? (we have 3 type ‘Uh’ wagons but have been unable to identify the ‘h’ suffix to type ‘U!’)
i = low-loading platform
kk = maximum load on class C route: variable between 20t & 25t (40-50t if ‘Ua’, 50-60t if ‘Uaa’)
oo = loose gravity discharge hopper. Underside of floor <70 cm above top of rails. Lifting gear cannot be used
s = OK at 100 km/h
t = carries less than 80t
u = maximum 102t
x = 10-axles
y = 12-axles
z = 18-axles
ux = 5-axle bogies

There are two main categories of “U” wagons (at least, as far as the FLMJ is concerned), plus some oddities.

The “Uad” (and “Uadp”) is the Iron Ore wagon used between Narvik and Luleå.
The “Uais” is a long bogie flat wagon (see model notes).
The “Uc” is a short 2-axle van with two spherical containers for cement, and is similar to the “U” and “Ucs.”
The “Uh” is a 2-axle tank wagon, rather like the Q12, but with UIC number.

  • Jeco has produced a large number of “Uh” wagons using a smaller body type that was produced in Sweden.
  • Märklin has produced various Cement wagons in the “U” series.
  • Roco has produced all wagon types in the “U” series, with the “Uad” being sold in packs of four, and with two different body types. Roco has also produced a number of “Uacs” bogie tank wagons in authentic Swedish liveries, but with German (and other) Railway numbers.
  • Togmodelle has produced the “Uais” with “AB Trempex” markings, carrying sheets of glass.
  • UGJ (now Lokstallet) produced the “Uad” and “Uad-p” iron ore wagons. The “Uad” was the same design as one of the two produced by Roco, but the “Uad-p” had raised body-sides.

Type Z

a = 4 wheel-sets
c = compressed air or air blast discharging system
e = heating equipment
s = OK at 100 km/h

Bogie and 2-axle tank wagons form type “Z.”

The “Zaces” is a bogie tank wagon used in the north of Sweden (see model notes).
The “Zacs” is a bogie tank wagon.
The “Zes” is a 2-axle tank wagon.

  • Märklin produced a “Zacs” tank wagon in “Nordwaggon” livery in a set with a type “Habins” van.
  • Piko has produced the “Zaces” in “LKAB” livery, once as a private commission, and more recently as a generally available model. More recently (and still in the shops in early 2012) Piko produced in conjunction with a Swedish trader and model railway club, a type “Zacns” in “Green Cargo” livery in three number versions – two as a set and one on its own, and each available for 2 or 3 rail!
  • Roco has produced both “Zacs” and “Zes” tank wagons.

Type Q

The letter “Q” lends itself to wagons not used in revenue trains, but by the infrastructure departments. Some former passenger coaches have also been given the “Q” designation, and we’re going to include them here, as a look at the FLMJ models!

Type “Qbd” is a ballast wagon, now operated by Banverket.
Type “Qfd” is a van, exactly like the “Tbis” (see below), but marked for use by the TGOJ.
Type “QIM” is a dynamometer car (Mätvagn) used by Banverket, and was a 1940s style passenger coach.
Type “QLT” is a general Staff coach, again used by Banverket, and was a 1960s style passenger coach.

  • Lima made, as a limited edition, the “QLT” coach, using their standard “A2” coach body.
  • Roco has produced both the “Qbd” ballast wagon (as a set of two) and the “Qfd” van in two versions; all as limited editions.
  • UGJ supplied the coach body to a third party to produce the “QIM” Mätvagn, as a limited edition.

Type Q12

The “Q12” is a designation given to 2-axle tank wagons not mentioned elsewhere, plus one oddity! These do not generally have UIC numbers.

  • Brawa has produced a 4-axle wagon as type “Q12.” The model is designed to look like a 4-axle wagon, but actually runs as a bogie-wagon in order to accommodate model railway curvature!
  • Jeco has produced a large number of “Q12” wagons using a smaller body type that was produced in Sweden.
  • Liliput has produced a tank wagon type “Q12.”
  • Piko has produced an “Acid Bottle carrying wagon,” which is labelled as type “Q12.”
  • Roco has produced a set of two “Q12” tank wagons, one black, one silver.